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Why Scars are like Mushrooms

When you see a mushroom emerging from the ground, all you notice is the fruiting body of the fungus. Sometimes they can be tiny, sometimes they group together and sometimes they can be very large and obvious. Regardless of this they all appear to be a relatively confined structure. However, the part you see on the surface is only a very small part of the whole Fungi anatomy and the same is true for the SCARS on our bodies.

If you look beneath the ground, under a mushroom you will find a matrix of fibres called the Mycelium. These are the root network and can spread out for miles. They will interact, connect and blend into the fibres of plants, trees and other fungi. Through this network fungi can share food with the plants and trees, communicate with each other and spread out over vast areas.

Now whilst our scars don’t talk with each other and share nutrients with other structures in your body, their impact, as in fungi, is bigger than it seems.

Look under the skin of a scar and you will find a similar web of fibres. Whilst you only see a defined line of scar tissue at the surface, underneath threads from the scar can spread to surrounding structures, be that muscles, bones, fascia or organs.

These lines of scar tissue communicate in a less helpful way. They can cause tension, pull and restrict those other tissues caught up within them. They often stick layers of tissue together and the normal slide and glide between skin, the fascia and organs will no longer be present

So, in summary, if you have a scar, no matter how large or small, over time other areas of your body can start to feel restricted, tight or painful. This may well be the result of the matrix of scar tissue trailing off from that scar. With advances in medical technology, many more people are now having surgery and more operations are able to be done through keyhole surgery, but don’t forget the size of the scar you see on the surface doesn’t always match the size of the area affected inside.